Congressman Al Green, FSC Chairwoman Maxine Waters, and Subcommittee Chairs Emanuel Cleaver and Joyce Beatty’s Statement on a Commemorative Fair Housing Resolution

May 6, 2020 Issues: Financial Services, Housing

(Houston, TX) — On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, Congressman Al Green, House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, Subcommittee on National Security, International Development and Monetary Policy Chairman Emanuel Cleaver, and Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion Chairwoman Joyce Beatty released the following statement:

“The Fair Housing Act was the culmination of efforts orchestrated by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who ardently supported fair housing and envisioned a society free of discrimination. Unfortunately, Dr. King was assassinated before he could see this landmark legislation enacted, but on April 11, 1968 – a week after his assassination, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law,” said Congressman Al Green - Chair of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations. “In honor of the 52nd anniversary of this monumental step toward establishing equal opportunity in housing for all Americans, I and my colleagues in Congress—Representatives William Lacy Clay, Emanuel Cleaver, and Joyce Beatty—have introduced a Fair Housing Resolution.”

Congressman Green expressed his gratitude for the partnership of his colleagues in introducing this resolution recognizing April as Fair Housing Month, H. Res. 946. He added, “I must thank Chairwoman Maxine Waters of the Financial Services Committee for serving as an original cosponsor of this resolution as well as her dedication to eliminating discriminatory practices that have disproportionately affected communities of color and have been magnified during the COVID-19 pandemic. I must also thank my colleagues and fellow Financial Services subcommittee chairs who joined me in introducing this commemorative resolution.”

Congressman Green concluded by saying, “In the wake of this unprecedented global health crisis, we see how this virus has begun to widen disparities in housing, health care, and economic opportunity. We in Congress have the responsibility to further the efforts the Fair Housing Act started 52 years ago and must continue to work toward equity and fairness in housing for every American.”

Congresswoman Waters – Chair of the House Financial Services Committee – indicated, “I am pleased to join Subcommittee Chair Green in commemorating the Fair Housing Act and the month of April as Fair Housing Month. In 1968, Congress passed the Fair Housing Act to make housing discrimination illegal based on protected classes that include race, color, sex, religion, national origin, familial status, and disability. Unfortunately, 52 years later, housing discrimination and segregation continue to persist at alarming rates. In 2018 alone, there were over 31,000 housing discrimination complaints filed in the United States, the highest level ever reported by the National Fair Housing Alliance since it began compiling national complaint data 25 years ago. As Chairwoman of the House Financial Services Committee, I am fighting everyday to strengthen and protect fair housing regulations in this country and provide relief for communities through equitable allocation of federal funding during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

“52 years ago, the Civil Rights Movement, led by icons such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and John Lewis, reached its apex when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law,” said Congressman Cleaver – Chair of the Subcommittee on National Security, International Development and Monetary Policy. “Whilst this landmark legislation and the Civil Rights Movement furthered our nation’s progress toward equality for all, the COVID-19 pandemic has illustrated vividly the inequalities our nation still faces in regards to housing, health care, and economic mobility. This resolution is in honor of the men and women who fought for true justice under the law; a reminder of the work unfinished; and a call for unified action to eliminate the disparities laid bare for all to see during the current public health crisis.”

Congresswoman Beatty – Chair of the Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion – said, “Thanks to the Fair Housing Act, Americans have the right to live where they choose, regardless of race, gender, religion, disability, or family status—but the dream of equal housing opportunity is far from fulfilled. Still today, it is legal to refuse housing based on sexual orientation and gender identity, and institutional racism continues to make it very difficult for people of color to access affordable, quality housing. That is why I am proud to join with Congressman Green in recognizing the lifechanging impacts of the Fair Housing Act and will continue working with him and likeminded colleagues to ensure that every American can access housing that best meets their needs.”

(Houston, TX) — On Wednesday, May 6, 2020, Congressman Al Green, House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, Subcommittee on National Security, International Development and Monetary Policy Chairman Emanuel Cleaver, and Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion Chairwoman Joyce Beatty released the following statement:

“The Fair Housing Act was the culmination of efforts orchestrated by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., who ardently supported fair housing and envisioned a society free of discrimination. Unfortunately, Dr. King was assassinated before he could see this landmark legislation enacted, but on April 11, 1968 – a week after his assassination, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law,” said Congressman Al Green. “In honor of the 52nd anniversary of this monumental step toward establishing equal opportunity in housing for all Americans, I and my colleagues in Congress—Representatives William Lacy Clay, Emanuel Cleaver, and Joyce Beatty—have introduced a Fair Housing Resolution.”

Congressman Green expressed his gratitude for the partnership of his colleagues in introducing this resolution recognizing April as Fair Housing Month, H. Res. 946. He added, “I must thank Chairwoman Maxine Waters of the Financial Services Committee for serving as an original cosponsor of this resolution as well as her dedication to eliminating discriminatory practices that have disproportionately affected communities of color and have been magnified during the COVID-19 pandemic. I must also thank my colleagues and fellow Financial Services subcommittee chairs who joined me in introducing this commemorative resolution.”

Congressman Green concluded by saying, “In the wake of this unprecedented global health crisis, we see how this virus has begun to widen disparities in housing, health care, and economic opportunity. We in Congress have the responsibility to further the efforts the Fair Housing Act started 52 years ago and must continue to work toward equity and fairness in housing for every American.”

Congresswoman Waters – Chair of the House Financial Services Committee – indicated, “I am pleased to join Subcommittee Chair Green in commemorating the Fair Housing Act and the month of April as Fair Housing Month. In 1968, Congress passed the Fair Housing Act to make housing discrimination illegal based on protected classes that include race, color, sex, religion, national origin, familial status, and disability. Unfortunately, 52 years later, housing discrimination and segregation continue to persist at alarming rates. In 2018 alone, there were over 31,000 housing discrimination complaints filed in the United States, the highest level ever reported by the National Fair Housing Alliance since it began compiling national complaint data 25 years ago. As Chairwoman of the House Financial Services Committee, I am fighting everyday to strengthen and protect fair housing regulations in this country and provide relief for communities through equitable allocation of federal funding during the COVID-19 pandemic.”

“52 years ago, the Civil Rights Movement, led by icons such as Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and John Lewis, reached its apex when President Lyndon Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act into law,” said Congressman Cleaver – Chair of the Subcommittee on National Security, International Development and Monetary Policy. “Whilst this landmark legislation and the Civil Rights Movement furthered our nation’s progress toward equality for all, the COVID-19 pandemic has illustrated vividly the inequalities our nation still faces in regards to housing, health care, and economic mobility. This resolution is in honor of the men and women who fought for true justice under the law; a reminder of the work unfinished; and a call for unified action to eliminate the disparities laid bare for all to see during the current public health crisis.”

Congresswoman Beatty – Chair of the Subcommittee on Diversity and Inclusion – said, “Thanks to the Fair Housing Act, Americans have the right to live where they choose, regardless of race, gender, religion, disability, or family status—but the dream of equal housing opportunity is far from fulfilled. Still today, it is legal to refuse housing based on sexual orientation and gender identity, and institutional racism continues to make it very difficult for people of color to access affordable, quality housing. That is why I am proud to join with Congressman Green in recognizing the lifechanging impacts of the Fair Housing Act and will continue working with him and likeminded colleagues to ensure that every American can access housing that best meets their needs.”